Creamy Sweet Corn Thick Soup With Pork

I learnt this creamy sweet corn soup many years ago, while I was still in university. I then realised it’s quite a common soup made in Hong Kong families. It’s very simple to make, and is sweet and savoury all at once. For those nights when you need to whip something up quickly.

For this recipe, it is important to use the CREAMY sweet corn and not the corn kernels, else you will not get the kind of intended flavours that the soup is meant to impart. For the pork, you can generally use any pork that is not too fat. I told my butcher about what I was using it for, and he went “you want the soft one?” and gave me this piece. You see, you can use the usual lean pork (肉眼) but the texture when you gnaw into it won’t be as nice. Continue reading “Creamy Sweet Corn Thick Soup With Pork”

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Creamy Mushroom And Potatoes.

I was in the market last week when I saw these really nice and fresh brown button mushrooms and I knew I had to get them. I bought some fresh potatoes and decided to try making a creamy dish with it, since I had some creme fraiche left in the fridge which I need to finish up soon.

The resulting dish was so satisfactory that I decided to make it again this week, although I think for most people this would be a better side dish than a main, because it’s really quite rich. I eat it on it’s own because I like rich tasting foods, so it works well for me, so be warned, it’s not healthy at all. Continue reading “Creamy Mushroom And Potatoes.”

Foochow Red Wine Chicken (红糟鸡)

红糟鸡, aka Glutinous Red Wine Chicken, is my absolute favourite Foochow dish, and that is as Foochow as I get, because I was brought up more with the Cantonese influence on things and speak the latter dialect instead of the former.

But this dish, is gold to me. Perhaps because of it’s rarity in Singapore too. It’s not something you find easily available in hawker centres, and even if you do, the quality is often lacking. The key ingredient, the red glutinous wine residue (or lees as they term it) is hard to get. In recent years, I found a China-made version which I thought was really quite edible, but nothing compares to the ones my mum brings back from Malaysia when she visits. Look at the deep red colour of the residue, the taste is rich and carries depth. My mum gets them from my auntie, who gets them from Sitiawan, a small town in Malaysia, where the Foochow influence is still strong. Continue reading “Foochow Red Wine Chicken (红糟鸡)”

Glass Noodles With Shredded Chicken.

I had a friend who could cook very well invite me over to her home some years ago, and she was very good at these simple 1 dish noodle items. One of them was this glass noodle (tanghoon) dish, which was something that I never thought to cook. She also used lots of aromatics and herbs, which was very new to me, but lent such a nice flavour that I made a mental note to try it for myself. And I did experiment a few times with it, and had very satisfying outcomes. Continue reading “Glass Noodles With Shredded Chicken.”

Fish Head Porridge.

Years ago when I worked in an ad agency that was right next to the Maxwell Market, I used to LOVE (and I do mean LOVE) this one small porridge stall known as “城记” Cheng Ji Porridge. Now, most people know about Zhen Zhen or He Ji porridge in Maxwell, but few talk about Cheng Ji. Most of the regulars in this stall have been regulars for 20-30 years, comprising mostly of old uncles. It was a small shop comprising of 3 persons (I think it was a parent + daughter team). Being a big Yu Sheng (raw fish) fan, I have tried the raw fish from all 3 stalls but Cheng Ji is my undisputed champion (though pretty unknown comparatively). But that wasn’t the best food item in  the stall, for my hands down dish, was it’s Fish Head Porridge.  Continue reading “Fish Head Porridge.”